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If you were planning on watching The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, World War Z, or Transformers: Age of Extinction on Netflix Instant Streaming, sorry for the late warning, but today is the last day for those and several other newer movies. Netflix is ending its deal with Epix after several years, which is going to remove a lot of high profile movies from the streaming service.

While Netflix understands that viewers want newer movies, they’re also not in a hurry to acquire films that can be easily accessed through a variety of other services. Movies like The Hunger Games and Transformers are practically jumping out from every movie service under the sun, so Netflix is comfortable waving goodbye. They want to offer exclusive content, which is obvious when you look at the slate of Netflix original shows that have cropped up, as well as the deals they’ve been striking with various actors to produce original films for the service.

Ted Sarandos, the Chief Content Officer at Netflix, wrote a blog post about the decision to cut ties with Epix, which is half mission statement/half plugging their upcoming content. For what it’s worth, I agree with Sarandos and I like the direction that Netflix is taking. People have been arguing for years that Netflix’s streaming service is lacking, mainly because the service doesn’t often acquire the newer, bigger budget stuff, so this doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. Now Netflix is just being more forward about what they’re trying to offer and specifically what they’re not trying to offer.

So, as a rabid Netflix apologist, here’s my plea: get more obscure stuff. Sarandos makes it clear that Netflix isn’t going full exclusive (contrary to what the folks in the Netflix blog comments seem to think).

“Through our original films and some innovative licensing arrangements with the movie studios, we are aiming to build a better movie experience for you.”

My “better movie experience” consists of titles that are hard to find, either because they’re old or they were never widely distributed in the first place. The sort of titles that used to be available through Netflix’s disc service before the discs got damaged and Netflix never bothered to replace them. I have dozens of movies in the “Saved Titles” portion of my DVD queue, all because their availability is “uknown.”


Make them known, Netflix.

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