SONTE Film Brings Smart Windows Home

Last summer, I looked into a Kickstarter project that seemed like a neat idea called SONTE Film. The idea behind the project was to create an affordable yet effective way of tinting windows without having to go to the expense of installing smart glass or motorized shades. At the time of the previous post there was about a month left to go for funding, and it was still up in the air as to whether the project would see the light of day (pun definitely intended).

Well, they made it! Not only did they achieve their funding goal, but the product has recently hit the market. They’re a little behind on their estimated delivery date (which was originally slated for last September), but then that does tend to happen with crowdfunded projects due to reality being unwilling to comply with plans drawn up on paper. For those of you who became backers, your wait is now over.

SONTE works like an LCD TV, essentially. You apply a thin, LCD-based film to your windows with a reusable semi-permanent adhesive, plug each one into a standard outlet, and you’re off and running. Basically. Each kit comes with a small clip which attaches to the corner of the film and plugs into a Wi-Fi enabled transformer, which allows the panel to be controlled with either an app or a traditional switch. The panels are constructed of a layer of conductive liquid-crystal polymer sandwiched between layers of PET plastic, and they can be trimmed to fit your particular window without worry you’ll damage them.

Right now, the panels are only controllable with the switch or an app, but SONTE is working on making them compatible with home automation systems such as ZigBee. This would not only allow you to control your window tinting along with everything else in your house, but would allow them to be programmed based on room temperature.

Each panel offers 99% UV protection, and requires just 4-5 watts/meter for power. Cost is approximately $290.00 US per meter.


Source: Popular Science

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