When Apple denied the FBI’s request for a backdoor into a terrorist’s iPhone, they emerged as the protectors of our privacy. Though that wasn’t the first time they had brought down the hammer to protect our info.

In 2015, Apple became aware that the Uber app was identifying and tagging iPhone users, even after the app had been deleted. This was a clear violation of the app store’s privacy rules, so Tim Cook called a meeting with Uber CEO Travis Kalanick. The meeting began with a very calm Tim Cook saying “so, I’ve heard you’ve been breaking some of our rules,” and ended with an ultimatum: fix the app or it goes away entirely.

Obviously, losing access to iPhone users would cripple Uber’s business, so of course Kalanick complied. Though Kalanick denied using the app to track users, saying instead the feature was for fraud detection. In Uber’s defense, tagging phones in this way is a common way of fighting fraud.

However, this isn’t the first time Uber has been called out for deceptive practices. In 2014, they used an internal feature called “God View” to track a reporter’s location without her knowing about it. They’ve also used software to hide suspicious activities from local authorities.

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