verizon
By now, you’ve surely heard about how Verizon wants to come to Canada. They’ve expressed interest in buying Wind Mobile for about $700 million and they could be interested in snatching up Mobilicity too, and then they’ll get involved in the juicy spectrum auction too. The Big Three incumbants are crying foul over “unfair” competition and Bell Canada’s President and CEO George Cope even wrote an open letter to all Canadians over the matter. Except, according to Ben Klass, Mr. Cope is full of crap.

The open letter reply, I guess you could call it, goes through several of the points that were made by the Bell CEO, illustrating how inaccurate, misleading or hypocritical they are. For example, he finds it strange that the Bell CEO would say it is “unusual” to write to all Canadians when Bell is Canada’s “top communications company.”

Perhaps most interestingly, Bell (along with Rogers and Telus) say that they don’t want to see an American company get an unfair advantage as they invade the Canadian marketplace, but did you know that “Bells permission to operate in Canada was initially obtained by agents acting in the interest of the (American) National Bell Telephone Company”?

Bell began its life in Canada as a branch plant of an American company; in a strange twist of fate, its now a descendant of National Bell Telephone Verizon which is contemplating (re)entering the Canadian market.

The letter, which I encourage you to read in its entirety on Ben Klass’ blog, goes on to discuss the three “loopholes” that Bell wants to see closed and Bell’s arguments aren’t exactly valid either.

I, for one, welcome our Big Red overlords north of the 49th parallel. It’s not so much that I expect the Verizon management of Wind Mobile (if they retain that brand) will offer me even better prices, but there is hope that they could bring better customer service and potentially more bang for my cellular buck. At the very least, “Verizon Canada” would have enough of a financial backing to really give Bell, Telus and Rogers a run for their money and it is with that added pressure that Canadians could start to see better deals and better service.

Share This With The World!
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •