While it may be a stretch to say services like Airbnb and Uber are “revolutionary,” they’re certainly novel ideas. The sharing aspect of the services makes them affordable, innovative alternatives to traditional businesses, which means they’ve been disruptive in some of the cities where they’ve set up shop. Due to this, a ten-city coalition is working together to adopt a set of rules and regulations for these new companies.

The list is heavy on tourist hotspots, with New York, Paris, Athens, Barcelona, and Toronto all part of the coalition. These new rules are being discussed in private, and Paris is reportedly pushing to have a first draft finished by October.

Uber and Airbnb have become househould names even for those of us who live in smaller towns that don’t necessarily offer the services. Taxi companies have been at war with ride-sharing services for some time, and NYC and Berlin have both recently blocked Airbnb from advertising entire apartments. This is the stuff that makes me wonder if the services really are revolutionary. If they weren’t, why would they be shaking things up so much? They’re confronting traditional business models and their success seem to suggest that they’re on the winning team.

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