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While some other companies may have dabbled here and there in the technology before, it wasn’t until Tesla rose to the forefront that we really started to have long and hard discussions about the future viability of electric vehicles. Now, we’re seeing continued development of electric cars like the Nissan Leaf and Bolt EV, and Mercedes has pledged to invest one billion dollars to build EVs in the US. Now, we’ve got a rather unexpected name in the mix with plans for a Dyson electric car right around the corner.

We’ve heard about inklings of this idea since May 2016, but that was more of a secret project that the vacuum and blade-less fan company had largely kept under wraps until today. The company has now confirmed that the rumors are true and we will indeed have a Dyson electric car ready for the road by 2020.

And Dyson is definitely putting their money where their proverbial mouth is, building a Dyson EV team of more than 400 employees dedicated to the project. All said, Dyson plans to invest somewhere in the neighborhood of £2 billion in development. James Dyson says he “it has remained my ambition to find a solution to the global problem of air pollution” and this ambition extends far beyond hair dryers and cordless vacuums.

We have to remember that Dyson has already recruited some top execs from Aston Martin and Tesla too, so we can have some assurance that the Dyson electric car will at least be stylish in appearance. It’ll also be expensive, most likely, as Dyson said that “the better figure is how much of a deposit [potential buyers] would be prepared to put down.” This follows the same road map that Tesla had followed, as the Tesla Roadster, Model S and Model X aren’t exactly cheap.

The Tesla Model 3 will be more affordable, but if we’ve learned anything about Dyson over the years, they’re not about being cheap and affordable. A typical Dyson vacuum costs more than many other brands. The new Supersonic hairdryer is £299. Of course a Dyson electric car would be geared (no pun intended) toward the more premium end of the market. They don’t want it to suck (pun totally intended).

One big advantage that a Dyson EV could have over Tesla and other competitors is with battery life and range. Dyson acquired a battery company called Sakti3 for $90 million, and they say they have a solid-state lithium-ion battery that produces more than 400Wh/kg in energy density. That’s about two times what Tesla gets out of its Panasonic shells (240Wh/kg) and arguably safer too.


Would you buy a Dyson EV?

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