When word got around that certain iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus models may experience better battery life than others based on who manufactured the A9 chip, a portion of the Internet frantically began testing their own devices. Apple claims that the difference in battery life is an insignificant 2-3% and that the homebrew tests are flawed.

Apple’s right. The homebrew tests basically top out the CPU performance until the phone dies and that’s how they gauge how long the battery lasted. The problem is that this sort of testing in no way resembles real-world usage of the phones. People deplete their smartphone batteries by talking, texting, surfing the Internet, taking selfies, watching YouTube, playing games, and a whole host of other activities, all of which consume varying amounts of battery life.

When Apple gathers their data, though, it’s from this realistic usage. In fact, when iPhone users agree to anonymously submit data to Apple from their iPhones, this is the kind of data that Apple is collecting. Apple is getting battery life data straight from the horse’s mouth, to use a phrase that sort of works in this context (but not really).

So yes, the chips made by TSMC and the chips made by Samsung use different amounts of power, but you’ll never notice the difference.

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